Depiction of Jain cosmology, Gujarat, 19th century

Gouache on cotton. Richly coloured portrayal of the “two and a half continents” (Adhaidvipa) with the palace of the four Tirthankaras in each corner. In the centre and at the border explanatory text. Framed and under glass. Dimensions of cloth ca. 71 x 81 cm, of frame 81 x 91 cm. 

Cf. Jan van Alphen, 2500 Years of Jain Art and Religion, Antwerp (Etnografisch museum) 2000, pp. 117 - 120.

Hermann Historica, 68th Auction, Lot Nr. 3178

[archived source]

Derp fix

Apparently the source URL of my last post, 14th century Burgundian helmet with mask visor, the horrible mess that it is, won’t take you to the item.

I now replaced it with what the museum calls its permalink, but I’m still wary about URIs that look like that.

I’m not sure if that will fix all the consequent reblogged posts, but for the inconvenience of propagating broken data, I thought to translate some interesting details from the item description.

Instead I discovered that there are more images of the helmet. Larger images.

I’ll just leave them here.


image


image


These next three have also their originals which come in delicious resolution.

image

Original: ftp://ftp.emuseumplus.lsh.se/web/hires/M_T/M_T05000-05999/M_T05400-05499/lm_t05497.jpg [2480x2938]


image

Original: ftp://ftp.emuseumplus.lsh.se/web/hires/M_T/M_T04000-04999/M_T04300-04399/lm_t04396.jpg [2960x3744]

Unfortunately, I don’t have any information on that sword. I’ll post if I’ll find.


image

Original: ftp://ftp.emuseumplus.lsh.se/web/hires/M_A/M_A02000-02999/M_A02100-02199/LN_A02125_002125.jpg [2480x3292]


image


image


Well, about those details. The helmet belonged to the set of Gustav Vasa’s plate armor suit. It was smithed ca. 1540 either in Augsburg or Nürnberg. The visor is from the same era as the helmet, but they did not belong together originally.

That’s unfortunately it. The rest of the description appears just to summarize its visual properties.

gearboxx is right. I would definitely not want to confront that on a battlefield. I didn’t even first notice it had teeth.

Tagged:  meta  armor  renaissance  history  sweden  helmet    
14th century Burgundian helmet with mask visor, owned by king Gustav I Vasa

14th century Burgundian helmet with mask visor, owned by king Gustav I Vasa

Tagged:  armor  renaissance  lang:sv    
Tagged:  abandoned  urban exploring    

paulev said: hey, you still there. I really miss your posts

Aw man, thanks. I know I’ve been neglecting this, and I feel bad about it.

It feels like I’ve moved on from just absorbing content. Now I want to create it.

Tumblr used to help kill time when I was more depressed, but now I get anxious that I’m wasting time trying to find good content that fits the theme of dreams.

I’ll try to post more regularly from now on, now I’m again more confident that my posts matter :)

Tagged:  meta  ask    
Tagged:  weee man  sculpture    

transitmaps:

Here’s a fantastic follow-up post from Owen Lett (the man who brought you this neat fantasy transit map of Victoria, BC) in response to yesterday’s tutorial about point type in Illustrator.

There’s a lot to like about this approach, especially the integrated type point and station marker (two overlaid points define both elements and both can be placed simultaneously) and the use of paragraph styles (an often-overlooked feature in Adobe Illustrator) gives the ability to quickly change things if required later on. The downside is the need to adjust margins via the tedious Character palette, although is that actually any worse than manually nudging with arrow keys?

pw3n:

This post is in response to Cameron Booth’s Point Type Label tutorial on his rather excellent Transit Maps blog. I’m writing this here because it feels a bit more efficient than bombarding him with a few dozen tweets.

I too use point type for labels on transit maps. But I also like to integrate paragraph and character styles wherever possible. I do this because, in theory, it makes it easier if I decide much later that I need to make a broad sweeping change (like choosing a new typeface or updating the character colour).

What I’ve also found is that by adjusting indents and baseline shifts, I can place the text point right in the middle of a station dot or at the intersection of two gridlines (see the second and third pictures for example; I’ve also shown how it can work for different station markers). If you’re using Smart Guides, everything should snap nicely into place.

Here’s a sample set up, which you can see in the first picture:

  • A character style for the basics, such as font family, size, leading, tracking, colour. I made a second style for a terminus station which is the same as the base, but with bold weight.
  • A number of paragraph styles for a variety of station type alignments. Here I’ve got a map with lines at 45 degree angles, so I’ve eight styles and named them after compass directions.
  • I made one bonus style to show how you can set one up for text that’s been rotated (and yet the text point remains in the middle of the station marker).

Now the whole point of Mr. Booth’s post was to show that Illustrator doesn’t actually align text precisely; some manual adjustment is necessary to get everything looking optically correct. He moved each label manually. My method doesn’t solve the problem of requiring some adjustment. But now instead of moving each label, you leave the label in place and adjust the left or right paragraph indent (see last picture).

There are some downsides to this technique  The primary problem I run into is with multiple line station labels. If the label has a positive baseline shift, then you’re going to need to update the baseline manually or create a new paragraph style. And then you might start to end up with an unwieldy amount of styles.

Another downside here is that manual adjustments override the paragraph style. So if you update the style at a later date, it may not affect something you’ve adjusted manually (it depends on what you’re updating).

Lastly, there is the issue of Illustrator itself. Its paragraph and character styles palette just isn’t that great, especially compared to InDesign. I don’t blame it; Illustrator is meant for… illustration. But having spent years building books in InDesign, you really notice what’s missing in Illustrator’s style options. InDesign has so much more; you can create keyboard shortcuts for specific styles, you can have styles based on other styles, you can reorder the styles. Illustrator does well, but I often find myself frustrated with it.

Is this an ideal solution? Not entirely. it is very mathematical, so to get everything looking perfect you’re still going to need to do a lot of eyeball adjustments. However, I find it’s a good way to get everything set up initially and keep things consistent throughout a project.

There is a way that eliminates measuring by eye.

I made the green guideline to a space of 30pt and to a real Guide (Ctrl/Cmd - 5) (select, right click > Make Guides)

Place the text with its anchor on top of the station marker anchor, then copypaste the text, select the text, go to Object > Expand, or right click > Create Outlines, so that you will make the font into editable vectors.

Now you can take ahold of the anchors, so move the text from the leftmost anchor to the guide - while pressing Shift and Ctrl/Cmd to get linear movement and object snapping - and a tooltip will tell you exactly how far the text moved.

You need to have Preferences > Smart Guides > Measurement Labels enabled to see the tooltip, and Preferences > Units > Points if you see other units.

 

In this case, the distance is 28.55pt, not exactly 30pt as Cameron stated. You can then place this number as the Left indent, and your text will be placed absolutely correct. Then you can delete the outlined text to leave only the correct label.

Method 2: You can also just place the text at the guide, outline it, and draw any object between the leftmost anchor and the station marker anchor, and the tooltip will tell you the same number.

It might be extreme up to the point of superfluous to push vectors by fractions of points, but if you’re obsessed with exact measurements as I am, now you know how.

Tagged:  transit map  tutorial  adobe illustrator     Reblogged from transitmaps

mission-em-possible:

Mokoia Island is my favourite place in the world! It’s very Tapu (kind of like ‘sacred’) and special to local Maori tribes, plus it’s an ecological sanctuary for native species. There’s a very cute legend attached to it too :)

My dad’s a surveyor and has inherited a lot of New Zealand’s first maps from our area. They’re hand drawn on cloth, and today I opened a great big trunk out back to find about a hundred of these ‘forgotten’ old maps. In NZ something 100-150 years old is pretty much the oldest you get :P

And he’s let me be ‘the custodian of’ (yes my Dad actually talks using words like that!) sorry, be the custodian of the first official map by explorers here of Mokoia Island. 
It’s gorgeous.
Like really gorgeous. And custodian means I get to look after it. Full time ;)

It’s so detailed - has watercolour painted contours and place names our generation hadn’t heard of, and soft and old … oh very nerdaliciously cool! And precious :)
xxx

Please donate them to a museum!

Or let them at least take high-resolution scans. If something should happen to the maps, or you, like an accident, there’s no telling will there be a next custodian to this bit of history, and will it be lost.

yearoftheglitch:

Excerpt of Idol No More

A Remix of Idle No More, by Stine Marie Jacobsen, for the 2013 Turku Biennial in Finland.

Sound and Video Processing by Phillip Stearns

Example of abstraction utilizing datamoshing techniques, mirroring and layering via various blend modes in Adobe Premiere.

I’ve been following you from 005 and I live near Turku and this is WHAT

Tagged:  personal  glitch     Reblogged from yearoftheglitch

liberatingreality:

I feel like planning a massive road trip where I would strategically plan a route around whoever would like to spend a bit of time with me.

I’m on the wrong continent :(

Tagged:  personal     Reblogged from liberatingreality
O’Neill: Let me ask you something. Why’d you become a pilot?
Sheppard: I think people who don’t want to fly are crazy.
O’Neill: Well, I think people who don’t want to go through the Stargate are equally as whacked.
[Stargate Atlantis: Rising, Part I]

O’Neill: Let me ask you something. Why’d you become a pilot?

Sheppard: I think people who don’t want to fly are crazy.

O’Neill: Well, I think people who don’t want to go through the Stargate are equally as whacked.

[Stargate Atlantis: Rising, Part I]

Tagged:  fighter jet  stargate atlantis  sga  flying     Reblogged from sid766
Reblogged from cruisingwithgunhead
biocanvas:

When cultured in a dish, neural stem cells can form three-dimensional clusters known as neurospheres, allowing researchers to investigate the stem cell-like properties of these neurons.
Image by Dr. Rowan Orme, Keele University.
Our on-going contest ends March 17! Check it out soon!

biocanvas:

When cultured in a dish, neural stem cells can form three-dimensional clusters known as neurospheres, allowing researchers to investigate the stem cell-like properties of these neurons.

Image by Dr. Rowan Orme, Keele University.

Our on-going contest ends March 17! Check it out soon!

Tagged:  neuron  neurology  microscopy  science     Reblogged from keepyourselfaware
neurolove:

Pyramidal Neurons.
Source: Dr Jonathan Clarke. Wellcome Images

neurolove:

Pyramidal Neurons.

Source: Dr Jonathan Clarke. Wellcome Images

Tagged:  neuron  neurology  science     Reblogged from infinity-imagined
edwardspoonhands:

syaoranxiaoli:

edwardspoonhands:

witchcitybitch:

gooomoon:


A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities.


When I was young I spent a lot of time in Ireland because my parents would always want to go back to their homes often. My mum used to tell me about faerie circles and she said that if you disturbed the ring by touching it, all the magic creatures would come and get you. I actually saw one of these rings for myself and was terrified the elves would come for me.

HANK HAS TO SCIENCE ON THIS
When the spore of some kinds of mushroom hits the ground to begin its life cycle, it will radiate out from the point of genesis with tiny little threads called mycelium which are actually the physical body of the fungus. The mycelium stretches throughout the soil, feeding by decomposing matter and, if there’s good food and consistent soil structure in every direction, it will radiate out in a nearly perfect circle. Eventually, when the center of the ring runs out of nutrients, the fungus goes into it’s spore production phase, and sends up “mushrooms” or the fruiting bodies of the fungus. These are all produced at the same time around the edge of the mycelium, taking all of the nutrients from the mycelium to produce these reproductive spore factories.
So each mushroom is not an individual organism, but rather the fruit of a sort of sub-surface fungal tree.
To me, this is even cooler than elves and fairies.

well let’s just keep them faerie circles because I’d like children to keep their fantasies and childhood memories

Agree to disagree…I would rather children revel in the excitement, beauty, wonder, and power of the real.

Science and fairy tales needen’t exclude one another. Both stories can co-exist.

edwardspoonhands:

syaoranxiaoli:

edwardspoonhands:

witchcitybitch:

gooomoon:

A fairy ring is a naturally occurring ring of mushrooms. They are also known as pixie’s rings, faerie circles, or elf circles. The English believed that fairy rings were where fairies came to dance and celebrate, the mushrooms of the rings were used as stools for the fairies to recuperate during the evenings festivities.

When I was young I spent a lot of time in Ireland because my parents would always want to go back to their homes often. My mum used to tell me about faerie circles and she said that if you disturbed the ring by touching it, all the magic creatures would come and get you. I actually saw one of these rings for myself and was terrified the elves would come for me.

HANK HAS TO SCIENCE ON THIS

When the spore of some kinds of mushroom hits the ground to begin its life cycle, it will radiate out from the point of genesis with tiny little threads called mycelium which are actually the physical body of the fungus. The mycelium stretches throughout the soil, feeding by decomposing matter and, if there’s good food and consistent soil structure in every direction, it will radiate out in a nearly perfect circle. Eventually, when the center of the ring runs out of nutrients, the fungus goes into it’s spore production phase, and sends up “mushrooms” or the fruiting bodies of the fungus. These are all produced at the same time around the edge of the mycelium, taking all of the nutrients from the mycelium to produce these reproductive spore factories.

So each mushroom is not an individual organism, but rather the fruit of a sort of sub-surface fungal tree.

To me, this is even cooler than elves and fairies.

well let’s just keep them faerie circles because I’d like children to keep their fantasies and childhood memories

Agree to disagree…I would rather children revel in the excitement, beauty, wonder, and power of the real.

Science and fairy tales needen’t exclude one another. Both stories can co-exist.